• American Pancakes

    These classic American pancakes are tall and fluffy, just like the ones served in a traditional American diner. The thick batter will be spongy and bubbly, from when the quickly made acidified buttermilk reacts with the baking powders, and when it hits the pan you get a wonderful light and fluffy pancake made. Made plain …

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  • Blueberry Pancakes

    Being based on an American pancake batter, these pancakes are light and fluffy – where the baking powder gives them lots of trapped air, unlike the traditional English Pancake which uses no raising agent beyond the egg. The fresh, seasonal blueberries are a wonderful addition, giving a burst of blueberry fruit taste in every bite …

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  • Aberdeenshire Oatcake

    Aberdeenshire Oatcakes are a regional recipe similar to the Scottish Oatcakes only made into a large, single round oatcake, to be baked on a griddle (girdle), before being cut into a fardell (farl) meaning quarters. Aberdeenshire Oatcake Recipe Once the oatmeal is baked and quartered some people then like to toast it in front of …

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  • Scottish Oatcakes

    Like the Aberdeenshire Oatcake these are a traditional Scottish recipe eaten on their own as a biscuit, with butter, honey and jam, or with meals as a savoury accompaniment. Scottish Oatcakes Recipe Oatcakes like these were baked off on a traditional Scottish Griddle or Girdle, if you don’t have one use a very heavy based …

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  • Banker’s Buns

    These oblong buns were famous in the City of London; called Banker’s Buns they were popular in a Victorian bakery in Lombard Street. They were either bought whole, at fourpence each, or cut in half, and sold at twopence. On the second page is an original description of them and a recipe from a Baker’s …

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  • Chelsea Buns

    Chelsea Buns … there are a lot of questions needed to be asked about a traditional Chelsea Bun, but the two main ones are: should they be square, or round in shape? should they be plain, or filled with currants? If we take an observers journal written in 1855 then we have our answers, they …

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  • Sally Lunns

    A Sally Lunn (sometimes as Sally Lund) is a delicate, gold-topped and sweetened bun which originated in Bath, but these are not to be confused with a Bath Bun (London Variety). Dorothy Hartley (1954) in her ‘Food In England’ wrote, “This yellow-white bun was an infernal trouble to make, taking from sunrise to sunset to …

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  • Bath Buns

    These original Bath Buns are known as the ‘London Variety’, purely and simply because another famous bun also comes from Bath, the Sally Lunn. Made from at least the early 1800s the Bath Bun recipe below is an authentic one which would have been traditionally made in a bakery, however the earliest Bath Bun recipes …

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  • Teisen Galan Ystwyll

    Teisen Galan Ystwyll is a traditional 12th Night Cake from Wales, with quite classical ingredients. The allspice and coriander particularly illustrate the cake’s heritage as an old recipe. And as such, with several competing winter spices, it is therefore improved by ageing the cake for up to three weeks before it is iced and then …

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  • Brotherly Love

    Brotherly Love is a wonderful Suffolk speciality bread / cake from South-East England, which is fantastic at Easter, (the traditional time to eat it); it is a sweet ‘yeast’ bread, similar in many instances to the popular ‘Lardy Cake’. Very few people or bakeries make it any more, which is a shame, as it really …

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  • A Collection Of Welsh Recipes

    This is a unique collection of recipes from Wales, collated by OAKDEN. This collection is under copyright (c) Oakden 2011 please do not reproduce elsewhere. These are mostly regional recipes taken from the main Welsh counties, from the 19th and 20th Centuries (1800s and 1900s). Welsh recipes tend to be simple, for the most part, …

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  • A Collection Of English Recipes

    This is a unique collection of recipes from England, collated by OAKDEN. This collection is under copyright (c) Oakden 2011 please do not reproduce elsewhere. These are mostly regional recipes taken from the main English counties, from the 19th and 20th Centuries (1800s and 1900s). The recipes are very much in the rural and local …

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